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Best stroke recovery tips

By Blog, Other Information

In moderate or severe injury, most of the rehabilitation process is experienced in the first three months after the stroke. The recovery continues, more slowly, until at least six months, and some patients continue to recover slightly near the year. Not all patients will fully recover. The time a patient will require rehabilitation (physiotherapy, occupational therapy, speech therapy or other) will vary depending on the objectives of each case. Thus, in an elderly patient with severe disease, rehabilitation can focus on getting a transfer from the bed to the wheelchair easily. This can be done in a few days or weeks. However, in a young patient, occupationally active, with mild to moderate speech or mobility impairment, rehabilitation can last up to six months, or until he/she reaches his/her greater functional capacity and return to work. These are some tips that will take you for a better and fastest rehabilitation. 1. Practice exercises repetitively One of the most important tips to speed recovery after a stroke is to practice repetition, which is repeating the exercises over and over again. This habit promotes neuroplasticity, which is the brain’s ability to recover itself after injury. 2. Follow a healthy diet Eliminate all processed…

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Adaptive equipment for stroke survivors

By Blog, Other Information, Support and help after Stroke

When strokes occur, the initial response is to concentrate on helping your loved one come out of the situation healthy. However, after all of the health scares are over, most stroke survivors are left with significant deficits that can cause problems in independence. These problems can arise over many activities, and they are usually addressed in the lengthy rehabilitation process. During that process, many forms of adaptive equipment are introduced to help the stroke survivor achieve as much independence as possible. The activities of daily living, or ADLs, refer to the routine steps we take to care for ourselves. Most stroke deficits affect the ADLs, and the equipment is designed to address these issues. These activities include dressing, grooming, bathing, walking, and eating. Fortunately, technology has been developed to allow even the most affected stroke survivor to perform some or all of these tasks independently. Even if your loved one is not able to perform them independently, they may be able to perform them with supervision or minimal help. It is helpful to consider some of the equipment you may need to use with your loved one. The best health care provider to ask about adaptive equipment is your occupational…

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Utensil Adaptations for Independent Eating

By Blog, Life after Stroke, Support and help after Stroke

Most stroke survivors strive for independence regardless of their limitations after their incident. Being independent is a great way to combat depression, feel good about yourself, and take some of the pressure off your caregiver. Even if you can only do a few things by yourself, it is important to do those things and to try to do as many other skills as possible. Eating by yourself is often considered an essential exercise for most stroke survivors. Besides bathroom skills, eating by yourself is usually at the top of the list. However, eating with one arm paralyzed or facial droop can make the act challenging. You may be surprised to know that several medical supply companies have developed specialized tools to help stroke survivors gain this piece of independence. Your best source of information for modifications in this area is your occupational therapist. They can help you develop the skills to perform the activities of daily living, such as eating. As a result, they are a wealth of information for the stroke survivor and caregiver. If your therapist has not already suggested the following modifications, it may be beneficial to mention them, emphasizing your desire for independent eating. Tabletops Tabletops…

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