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Support and help after Stroke

Adaptive equipment for stroke survivors

By Blog, Other Information, Support and help after Stroke No Comments

When strokes occur, the initial response is to concentrate on helping your loved one come out of the situation healthy. However, after all of the health scares are over, most stroke survivors are left with significant deficits that can cause problems in independence. These problems can arise over many activities, and they are usually addressed in the lengthy rehabilitation process. During that process, many forms of adaptive equipment are introduced to help the stroke survivor achieve as much independence as possible. The activities of daily living, or ADLs, refer to the routine steps we take to care for ourselves. Most stroke deficits affect the ADLs, and the equipment is designed to address these issues. These activities include dressing, grooming, bathing, walking, and eating. Fortunately, technology has been developed to allow even the most affected stroke survivor to perform some or all of these tasks independently. Even if your loved one is not able to perform them independently, they may be able to perform them with supervision or minimal help. It is helpful to consider some of the equipment you may need to use with your loved one. The best health care provider to ask about adaptive equipment is your occupational…

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Invisible disabilities: Dealing with the Non Physical Problems following a Stroke

By Blog, Life after Stroke, Post stroke disabilities, Stroke Prevention, Support and help after Stroke No Comments

Everyone is familiar with the physical problems that follow a stroke. They are used to paralyzed arms, facial drooping, and difficulty walking. However, other parts of the brain may be affected that create disabilities that are no so readily noticeable. Physical problems are often easier to deal with and rehabilitate because they are obvious, but there are ways to treat the invisible signs, too. Some patients may have only invisible signs, and you don’t realize there is a problem. This is when you and your neurologists have to fully test a patient to determine if they have these hidden signs. Aphasia Aphasia is usually recognizable because it affects the way your loved one is able to communicate. It can affect both verbal communication and reading. Some stroke survivors with aphasia talk in truncated sentences or even make up words. You may see them searching for the right word and that can lead to frustration. In addition, aphasia makes understanding conversations difficult, and this can lead to a sense of isolation for the survivor. Apraxia Apraxia is another disability that may be easier to see because it affects how the stroke survivor coordinates their movements. Although they may not have any…

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Utensil Adaptations for Independent Eating

By Blog, Life after Stroke, Support and help after Stroke No Comments

Most stroke survivors strive for independence regardless of their limitations after their incident. Being independent is a great way to combat depression, feel good about yourself, and take some of the pressure off your caregiver. Even if you can only do a few things by yourself, it is important to do those things and to try to do as many other skills as possible. Eating by yourself is often considered an essential exercise for most stroke survivors. Besides bathroom skills, eating by yourself is usually at the top of the list. However, eating with one arm paralyzed or facial droop can make the act challenging. You may be surprised to know that several medical supply companies have developed specialized tools to help stroke survivors gain this piece of independence. Your best source of information for modifications in this area is your occupational therapist. They can help you develop the skills to perform the activities of daily living, such as eating. As a result, they are a wealth of information for the stroke survivor and caregiver. If your therapist has not already suggested the following modifications, it may be beneficial to mention them, emphasizing your desire for independent eating. Tabletops Tabletops…

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