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All about Stroke

Recognizing cerebral venous thrombosis

By | All about Stroke, Blog

A cerebral venous thrombosis (CVT) is a rare form of stroke. It takes place when a blood clot is formed in the cerebral veins (small veins in the brain that collect blood) and in the dural venous sinuses (the large veins in which blood is drained from the cerebral veins). The blood clot leads to an obstruction of the blood flow, which causes inflammation and damage to the brain tissue. The blood clot can be induced by infections (ear, mouth, face or neck), clotting disorders, oral contraceptive therapy or some drugs (such as tamoxifen or chemotherapy). It can also occur during pregnancy and postpartum (or postnatal) period. However, sometimes the underlying cause is unknown. Cerebral venous thrombosis is also known as: Cerebral vein thrombosis Cerebral venous and sinus thrombosis Cerebral venous sinus thrombosis (CVST) Cerebral sinovenous thrombosis (CSVT) Sinus and cerebral vein thrombosis Cerebral vein and dural sinus thrombosis Cortical cerebral venous thrombosis According to a scientific statement from the American Heart Association and the American Stroke Association, cerebral venous thrombosis mainly affects young adults and children, and represents only 0.5 to 1% of all strokes. Nevertheless, it is still a significant cause of death and disability, and early detection…

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Prevention of Stroke

By | All about Stroke, Blog, Stroke Prevention | No Comments

Stroke is an epidemic that is not usually given the press that heart disease and cancer usually get. Yet strokes kill millions of people every year worldwide. The American Heart Association does have a stroke prevention site, because stroke and heart disease are often found together. However, the push for the public to understand stroke symptoms and to get help immediately isn’t as publicized as the need for CPR and defibrillators. Some work places now have informational posters warning about the signs of a stroke, but stroke prevention and recognition is poorly understood. Symptoms are not the only issues that leave the public in the dark. How to prevent strokes is also not very well known. Everyone seems to know that they need to “take care of themselves” and “lead a healthy lifestyle,” but what do these concepts really mean in terms of stroke prevention? While it is true that the preventative measures between heart disease and stroke are similar, they are not exactly the same. In addition, it doesn’t hurt to follow the regulations for both conditions because they are very often seen together. If you want to lower your risk of stroke, you may want to take a…

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Pets and Stroke

By | All about Stroke, Blog, Other Information | One Comment

Strokes are a devastating condition in humans, but they are even more emotional when it is your pet that has had the stroke. First, it is difficult to notice the symptoms because the pet can’t tell you what it is feeling. Second, some pets have strokes and then recover on their own. The point is that pet strokes are a problem, and they can lead to difficult times for your pet as they recover. Of course, it would take a good deal of rehab to get a pet back to the pre-stroke shape. It is time and money intensive, but fortunately, strokes in pets are not that common. Dogs with brain tumors, diabetes, Cushing’s disease, and other rare diseases and conditions are likely to cause a dog to have a stroke. It is usually not something that happens spontaneously, but it is possible. If you think your dog is having a stroke, it is important to get them help as soon as possible. The treatments are limited for strokes in dogs, but a vet will be able to watch the dog to make sure the condition does not worsen. How to tell your pet had a stroke There are many…

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Why Do Second Strokes Happen?

By | All about Stroke, Blog, Life after Stroke, Stroke Prevention | No Comments

One stroke is a difficult occurrence to face, but many stroke survivors find that they end up having secondary strokes. Often, these strokes are more severe and can take more functioning away. Fortunately, you can prevent a secondary stroke by following the orders that your doctor has given you. If you ignore healthy suggestions, then the possibility of a secondary stroke is very high. Usually, it is unhealthy living that leads to a stroke in the first place, and by learning how to take care of yourself better, you can prevent further damage. If you’ve had an ischemic stroke, or a stroke caused by a clot, you are more likely to have a secondary stroke. Those who have had hemorrhagic strokes are not as at risk because a bleed in the brain is not likely to happen again. However, ignoring your blood pressure can lead to small bleeds in the brain that can lead to secondary strokes. You should be concerned about secondary strokes because they are so common. Take the time to talk to your doctor about the rate of secondary strokes and what actions you can take to prevent them. Failure to Control Blood Pressure and Cholesterol Blood…

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Visual Impairments Following a Stroke

By | All about Stroke, Blog, Life after Stroke | No Comments

Stroke causes a variety of symptoms, and most people know the main signs, such as paralysis, difficulty talking, and drooping face. One area you may not realize that also suffers from a stroke is vision. It makes sense, though: your eyes are just another set of nerves that are managed by the brain. If the part of the brain that makes sense of the impulse is injured by a stroke, then vision will be impacted. Sometimes, it is hard to tell that a stroke patient has a visual impairment because the symptoms are subtle. Very rarely does vision loss present as complete blindness, and visual impacts are not seen with all strokes. Most visual disturbances are in the broad categories of some visual loss and problems with visual perception. Although complete blindness is rare, partial blindness is one of the hallmark visual complications after a stroke. If you or your loved one had a stroke and are concerned over visual side effects, speak to your neurologist. They will be able to test visual fields to ensure that the eye and their corresponding nerves are working properly. How a Stroke Affects Your Vision Stroke can affect your vision in many different…

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