Invisible disabilities: Dealing with the Non Physical Problems following a Stroke

By Blog, Life after Stroke, Post stroke disabilities, Stroke Prevention, Support and help after Stroke No Comments

Everyone is familiar with the physical problems that follow a stroke. They are used to paralyzed arms, facial drooping, and difficulty walking. However, other parts of the brain may be affected that create disabilities that are no so readily noticeable. Physical problems are often easier to deal with and rehabilitate because they are obvious, but there are ways to treat the invisible signs, too. Some patients may have only invisible signs, and you don’t realize there is a problem. This is when you and your neurologists have to fully test a patient to determine if they have these hidden signs. Aphasia Aphasia is usually recognizable because it affects the way your loved one is able to communicate. It can affect both verbal communication and reading. Some stroke survivors with aphasia talk in truncated sentences or even make up words. You may see them searching for the right word and that can lead to frustration. In addition, aphasia makes understanding conversations difficult, and this can lead to a sense of isolation for the survivor. Apraxia Apraxia is another disability that may be easier to see because it affects how the stroke survivor coordinates their movements. Although they may not have any…

Read More

Why Do Second Strokes Happen?

By All about Stroke, Blog, Life after Stroke, Stroke Prevention No Comments

One stroke is a difficult occurrence to face, but many stroke survivors find that they end up having secondary strokes. Often, these strokes are more severe and can take more functioning away. Fortunately, you can prevent a secondary stroke by following the orders that your doctor has given you. If you ignore healthy suggestions, then the possibility of a secondary stroke is very high. Usually, it is unhealthy living that leads to a stroke in the first place, and by learning how to take care of yourself better, you can prevent further damage. If you’ve had an ischemic stroke, or a stroke caused by a clot, you are more likely to have a secondary stroke. Those who have had hemorrhagic strokes are not as at risk because a bleed in the brain is not likely to happen again. However, ignoring your blood pressure can lead to small bleeds in the brain that can lead to secondary strokes. You should be concerned about secondary strokes because they are so common. Take the time to talk to your doctor about the rate of secondary strokes and what actions you can take to prevent them. Failure to Control Blood Pressure and Cholesterol Blood…

Read More

Visual Impairments Following a Stroke

By All about Stroke, Blog, Life after Stroke No Comments

Stroke causes a variety of symptoms, and most people know the main signs, such as paralysis, difficulty talking, and drooping face. One area you may not realize that also suffers from a stroke is vision. It makes sense, though: your eyes are just another set of nerves that are managed by the brain. If the part of the brain that makes sense of the impulse is injured by a stroke, then vision will be impacted. Sometimes, it is hard to tell that a stroke patient has a visual impairment because the symptoms are subtle. Very rarely does vision loss present as complete blindness, and visual impacts are not seen with all strokes. Most visual disturbances are in the broad categories of some visual loss and problems with visual perception. Although complete blindness is rare, partial blindness is one of the hallmark visual complications after a stroke. If you or your loved one had a stroke and are concerned over visual side effects, speak to your neurologist. They will be able to test visual fields to ensure that the eye and their corresponding nerves are working properly. How a Stroke Affects Your Vision Stroke can affect your vision in many different…

Read More

Utensil Adaptations for Independent Eating

By Blog, Life after Stroke, Support and help after Stroke No Comments

Most stroke survivors strive for independence regardless of their limitations after their incident. Being independent is a great way to combat depression, feel good about yourself, and take some of the pressure off your caregiver. Even if you can only do a few things by yourself, it is important to do those things and to try to do as many other skills as possible. Eating by yourself is often considered an essential exercise for most stroke survivors. Besides bathroom skills, eating by yourself is usually at the top of the list. However, eating with one arm paralyzed or facial droop can make the act challenging. You may be surprised to know that several medical supply companies have developed specialized tools to help stroke survivors gain this piece of independence. Your best source of information for modifications in this area is your occupational therapist. They can help you develop the skills to perform the activities of daily living, such as eating. As a result, they are a wealth of information for the stroke survivor and caregiver. If your therapist has not already suggested the following modifications, it may be beneficial to mention them, emphasizing your desire for independent eating. Tabletops Tabletops…

Read More